Film Stand Development

featured, Film, Project, The Streets

Recently during my studies on film photography and development techniques, i came across the technique of “stand development

Apparently, doing this allows you to push your film (depending on which you use) much more easily and increases the sharpness and shadow details of the images taken.

So of course, i sought more info on this subject and came across a video done by Chuck Jines who runs a YouTube channel i frequent from time to time called Chuck Jines Photography

He calls his style “Grit Street Photography” and using his stand development technique, he gets the gritty look and feel of his film photography.

I love the type of photographers and photography that instantly make you get up and want to elevate yourself.

To me, this is what it’s all about

Keep seeking the knowledge where you can find it, and put it to practice.

You’ll find your way with hard work and dedication

After shooting a couple of rolls with the light meter on my Leica M6 pushed to 1600 on 400 speed film, i went about calculating my dilutions and getting to work on the developer and fixer.

Here are my calculations below: (keep in mind my tank is 1 Liter and fits 4 rolls, i was only developing 3 rolls)

1:100 = 250ml of water, 2.5ml of developer per roll

1:100 = 750ml of water, 7.5ml of Rodinal Developer for 3 rolls

1:4 = 200ml of water, 50ml of Ilford Fixer per roll

1:4 = 600ml of water, 150ml of Fixer for 3 rolls

So since i was doing a 120 minute stand development after i finished mixing my chemicals, i fired up netflix and prepared some stuff to watch while i waited in between agitations.

If you watch the video above you will see that Chuck’s technique after mixing is this:

Add developer, agitate for the first minute and after every 30 minutes agitate for 15 seconds until the 120 minutes is up then Stop, Fix, Wash and Dry as usual

I’d like to share some of the results of my FIRST stand development test

Keep in mind this is my very first stand development and results may not be as good as Chucks 🙂 but i know i will be doing more and fine tuning my technique!

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I seem to come across protests no matter where i go! These are some of the best ways to practice your photography in my opinion

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I believe i also have to mention how alive the streets seemed to be on this day.

So much going on, and so much to see and compose.

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Honestly, i believe the pictures came out well but my metering may have been off.

I did not see the type of shadow detail and sharpness that i’ve seen in other photographer’s stand developments.

I’m not sure if this is due to the film i was using (Ultrafine Xtreme 400) or the technique i used.

I recently purchased a brick (10 rolls) of Tri-X also and i plan on using these to test that.

Stay tuned to an updated post with Tri-X being used with this same Stand Development technique.

In either case, i would like to thank Chuck Jines for making that video and giving me something to use as a template for my own technique.

Hope everyone has enjoyed this post and if you see anything WRONG or can give any tips on stand development, feel free to comment below.

PEACE

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2 thoughts on “Film Stand Development

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